Mythic Fantasy: Pages of Pain

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Memory, Mythology, Poetry & Prose, Psychology

What a chi­mera of a book this is. It has one foot in plain old fan­tasy, with quite a few battles, some spell-sling­ing, and a hero on a quest. The other foot is deep in myth. When I first read this book, around seven years ago, I did­n’t quite get it. I was already quite famil­iar with Plan­es­cape, the Dun­geons & Dragons set­ting that forms the back­drop for this novel. How­ever, in the novel, I found little of the vast vis­tas and wide-eyed won­der that typ­i­fied the set­ting for me. Instead, the book’s nar­rat­ive is almost com­pletely con­fined to a labyrinth, which offers only a few passing glimpses of all the ima­gin­at­ive places that make up the Plan­es­cape mul­ti­verse. How­ever, upon a second read­ing and some brief reflec­tion, I think I now see what Den­ning tried to do here.

Harlequin Valentine, or Lustprinzip & Todestrieb

Posted 2 CommentsPosted in Death, Dreams, Music, Poetry & Prose, Psychology, Visual Art

Recent­ly I had a dream where­in I was re­peated­ly meet­ing a dark-hair­ed wo­man, pre­domi­nant­ly in my work­place and other day-to-day en­viron­ments. On a very lit­eral level - as far as any such thing exists in dreams - it was just some­one who appear­ed to take plea­sure in my com­pany and who came to see me often, me enjoy­ing her com­pany and the atten­tion it brought, but not desi­ring any rela­tions bey­ond friend­ship. My self-effa­cing side would say she was a pro­jec­tion of lat­ent nar­cissism. How­ever, on an emo­tional and sym­bolic level, there was a deeper attrac­tion, but at the same time a mor­tal fear or sense of danger. This see­ming­ly nor­mal woman was at some non-appar­ent level a femme fatale.