On Cheezer

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Film

Let me take you to the magi­cal realm that is the 1990s of my youth. It’s OK. Peo­ple were cool back then, you’ll see. Some­where in that myth­i­cal land of bound­less peak-cap­i­tal­ist op­ti­mism, not to men­tion ac­tual­ly the best music ever — feel free to try to de­bate me on this and run away screa­ming — we had some­thing called a Chee­zer.

When My Ship Comes In

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Death, Digital Media & Videogames, Film, Religion

I had been want­ing to write some­thing about Cameron Kun­zel­man’s little game On August 11, A Ship Sailed Into Port for some time now, but recently I sat down to do it and it turned into a vague tex­tual and audio­visual medi­tation on death, choices, and get­ting by. It’s a bit of a loose, experi­mental column, but maybe you’ll enjoy it. Please do check out Kun­zel­man’s game, as it takes only five minutes, and if you’ve never seen Werner Herzog’s Nos­feratu before, here’s your chance to see some scenes.

The Iterations of Punxsutawney Phil

Posted Leave a commentPosted in Death, Digital Media & Videogames, Film, Gender & Sexuality, Memory, Posts by Topic:, Psychology, Social Interaction & Networks, War, Violence & Terrorism

Remem­ber Ground­hog Day? It’s that 1993 film about Bill Murray’s char­acter, Phil, who keeps reliv­ing the same day, Feb­ru­ary 2nd, in the Penn­sylvania town of Punx­sutawney, where on that day, the ground­hog Punx­sutawney Phil will pre­dict when winter’s going to end. […] It’s an awful lot like the way we tend to play video games these days. Faced with chal­lenges in a game, we have the quick­save and quick­load but­tons close at hand, ready to revert to an earlier point in the game to try again. If you get to replay a sec­tion of a story over and over again, any chal­lenge inher­ent in the ori­ginal situ­ation quickly morphs into a mat­ter of trial and error. Like Phil in Ground­hog Day, we get to try out every inter­action, every conver­sation option the world allows us. More im­por­tantly, in a typ­ical collap­sing together of char­acter and player, Phil – like us – retains (meta)­knowledge of every­thing he did earlier.