Shadow of the Future

Edith Södergran – “Framtidens skugga” (1920) My translation […Read more…]

On The Narrow Land

[Just moving some of my longer book reviews here from elsewhere. This one was originally posted on 16 june 2013.] This short story collection had been lying around the house for a while, but when Vance sadly passed away recently, decided to dust it off. Although I already had a pretty positive opinion of Vance […Read more…]

On The Eye of the Heron

[Just moving some of my longer book reviews here from elsewhere. This one was originally posted on 2 jun 2014.] Ursula K. LeGuin’s The Eye of the Heron is an engaging novella about oppression and resistance in a new world. The planet Victoria has been minimally settled by outcasts from Earth. A group of criminals, […Read more…]

On Dockskåpet

[Just moving some of my longer book reviews here from elsewhere. This one originally posted on 18 jun 2014.] Now and again I read these Scandinavian books that make want to be a translator. It’s opportunistic, I know, to only want to translate those rare books that really get at you. Professional translators have […Read more…]

Type Travels: Leigh Alexander’s Mona

Mona is a short story by Leigh Alex­ander with gor­geous illu­stra­tions by Emily Car­roll. The story is part sen­sual urban horror, part hom­age to the game Silent Hill 2. The story recent­ly went on sale, and I pro­vi­ded the design for the e-book ver­sions. Have a look at the design below, and don’t forget to buy a copy of the story! […Read more…]

Memory Insufficient: Language and Games

Recently, I had the honour of being guest editor on Memory Insufficient, the games history ezine. I edited the special issue on Language and Games. You can read the editorial from the issue below, but really you should just go and download the whole issue here [pdf], because it’s free. […Read more…]

Type Travels: The Sword of Welleran

Recently, I’ve become more and more inte­res­ted in book design and type­setting, and I deci­ded that I wanted to become better at it, and offer it as a service to other people. In the growing world of e-books and digi­tal reading, there is some­thing of a dearth of good design, and the aes­the­tics that I admire in prin­ted books have for the most part not found their way into the digi­tal realm. As an exer­cise, I’ve star­ted play­ing around with some public domain fantasy lite­ra­ture that I wanted to read anyway, such as the (early) works of Lord Dun­sany. In that spirit, I’ve recent­ly com­pleted a PDF setting of The Sword of Welle­ran And Other Stories, origi­nally pu­blished in 1908. […Read more…]

Nordic Larp (Book Review)

Over on First Person Scholar, I’ve published an extensive book review of Nordic Larp, an im­pressive and beautiful over­view of the Nordic live-action role­playing scene. In it I discuss how the book shows the diversity and experi­mental drive of the LARP scene in Scan­dinavia, and approach it briefly from a play-theoretical perspective. […Read more…]

On Norbert Wiener’s ‘God & Golem, Inc.’

While reading Annalee Newitz’ intriguing blog post on io9 about the history of the word cyber, I came across the name Norbert Wiener (not Weiner — get it straight, you Englishers) who had introduced the term Cybernetics as “the study of control and communication in machines and living beings”. His other works include the book God and Golem, Inc.: A Comment on Certain Points Where Cybernetics Impinges on Religion, and that title immediately caught my eye. Studies of the interaction between science, technology, and religion always interest me a lot, as do Golems and Jewish folklore, so Wiener had sold it to me easily. […Read more…]

No Control: on The Wasp Factory

Few novels com­pelled me as much to imme­diate­ly write my thoughts down as The Wasp Factory by Iain Banks. Usually I enjoy novels a lot while reading them (or not), but quick­ly dive into a new one after­wards. In this case, I felt the need to spend some words on it be­fore moving on. I’m pretty sure this means that the book has some sort of cla­rity and com­pact­ness of style that brings across its messa­ges very directly. I sure wasn’t the only one rea­ding The Wasp Factory this month. Banks passed away after a battle with cancer on June 9th, and a num­ber of my online friends and ac­quain­tances made a grab towards his debut novel, like I did. […Read more…]